Original Research

Clinically Relevant Four-Level Cancer-Related Fatigue Among Patients With Various Types of Cancer

Hsiao-Lan Wang,1 PhD, RN, CMSRN, HFS, Ming Ji,1 PhD, Connie Visovsky,1 PhD, RN, ACNP-BC, Carmen S. Rodriguez,1 PhD, RN, ACNP-BC, AOCN®, Amanda F. Elliott,1 PhD, RN, ARNP, Clement K. Gwede,2 PhD, RN, MPH, Tapan A. Padhya,2,3 MD, Marion B. Ridley,3,4 MD, and Susan C. McMillan,1 PhD, RN, ARNP, FAAN

1College of Nursing University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida; 2Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida; 3James A. Haley VAMC, Tampa, Florida; 4University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida

Authors' disclosures of potential conflicts of interest are found at the end of this article.

Hsiao-Lan Wang, PhD, RN, CMSRN, HFS, University of South Florida College of Nursing, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, MDC22, Tampa, FL 33612. E-mail: hwang5@health.usf.edu


J Adv Pract Oncol 2016;7:23–37 | doi: 10.6004/jadpro.2016.7.1.2 | © 2016 Harborside Press®


  

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to identify the association between clinically relevant four-level cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and quality of life (QOL). This secondary data analysis included 152 participants who completed both the 0 to 10 fatigue scale and the Multidimensional Quality of Life Scale-Cancer (MQOL-C). The four-level CRF included no CRF (score: 0), mild CRF (scores: 1–3), moderate CRF (scores: 4–6), and severe CRF (scores: 7–10). The MQOL-C contains five domains. Multiple linear regression models and post hoc analyses were applied while controlling for age, gender, education, marital status, racial background, cancer type, and time after diagnosis. Participants in the less severe CRF subgroup had significantly better scores on total QOL and QOL domains, except for the symptom distress domain. Significant between-CRF-level differences were only found in some of the QOL score comparisons. No difference between mild and moderate CRF subgroups was found in total QOL or in interpersonal well-being (no CRF > mild CRF, moderate CRF > severe CRF). There was no difference between the no and mild CRF subgroups in physical well-being (no CRF, mild CRF > moderate CRF > severe CRF). Our findings support the importance of using clinical guidelines to screen, evaluate, and manage CRF.




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