Research and Scholarship

Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm: A Single Institutional Case Series of a Rare Pancreatic Tumor

Kristen Oase,(1) MS, PA-C, Cheryl Meguid,(1) DNP, ACNP, Atsushi Oba,(1,2) Mohammed H. Al-Musawi,(1) MD, MSc, FIBMS-CTV, FRCS (Glasg), Alison Sheridan,(1) MD, Evan Norris,(1) MD, Sanjana Mehrotra,(1) MD, Mark A. Lovell,(3) MD, Richard D. Schulick,(1) MD, MBA, FACS, Steven A. Ahrendt,(1) MD, and Marco Del Chiaro,(1) MD, PhD, FACS

From (1)University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado; (2)Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan; (3)Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado

Authors’ disclosures of conflicts of interest are found at the end of this article.

Correspondence to: Kristen Oase, MS, PA-C, 13001 E. 17th Place, Aurora, CO 80045. E-mail: kristen.oase@cuanschutz.edu


J Adv Pract Oncol 2022;13(5):497–505 | https://doi.org/10.6004/jadpro.2022.13.5.3 | © 2022 Harborside™


  

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPN) are rare pancreatic cystic neoplasms with low malignant potential that tend to occur in young women. Due to the rarity of this disease, there are few large case series in the literature, and the exact pathophysiology remains unknown. In this article, we aim to share our institutional experience. Methods: Retrospective clinical data collection and analysis was performed on all patients with a diagnosis of SPN at the University of Colorado Hospital and Children’s Hospital of Colorado (n = 28). Results: Twenty-eight patients were diagnosed with SPN during the study period. The median age was 21.5 years, and the majority of patients were female (89.3%) and Caucasian (60.7%). Six patients were diagnosed incidentally (21.4%). The majority of tumors were in the pancreatic tail (46.4%), and most underwent distal pancreatectomy (64.3%). The mean tumor size was 5.4 cm, and R0 resection was achieved in 25 patients (89.3%). Ten patients underwent laparoscopic resection (35.7%). The median hospital length of stay was 8.5 days, and postoperative complication rate was 39.3%. Median follow-up was 41 months, with 78.6% of patients alive without evidence of disease, while 2 patients were lost to follow-up. Two patients developed recurrence/metastases, which were resected; both are alive without evidence of disease. Conclusion: SPN are rare pancreatic tumors diagnosed most frequently in young women. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment, and outcomes are excellent if complete resection is achieved. Predictors of malignant disease are inconsistent in current literature. Considerations should be made for a minimally invasive approach in patients with SPN. Multidisciplinary clinics may be helpful in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of pancreatic cystic lesions, with major potential for the advanced practitioner role.




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