Grand Rounds

Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma: An Unusual Presentation of a Rare Cancer

Jennifer L. Spicer, MA, PA-C

From Cancer Treatment Centers of America Phoenix, Goodyear, Arizona

Author’s disclosure of conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

Correspondence to: Jennifer Spicer, MA, PA-C, Cancer Treatment Centers of America Phoenix, 14200 W Celebrate Life Way, Goodyear, AZ 85338. E-mail: sa205025@atsu.edu


J Adv Pract Oncol 2021;12(8):854–862 | https://doi.org/10.6004/jadpro.2021.12.8.6 | © 2021 Harborside™


  

ABSTRACT

Retroperitoneal liposarcomas (RLPS) are rare tumors that have variable clinical behavior and complex treatment strategies based on presentation, histopathology, and genomics. Early identification is critical, and complete surgical resection remains the primary treatment, although chemotherapy and radiation are used on individual bases. Presenting symptoms are often nonspecific; therefore, a high degree of suspicion is essential for early diagnosis. In this report, the management of a 37-year-old otherwise healthy male with a large RLPS causing right groin/testicular pain is presented. After three evaluations in the emergency department, the patient was diagnosed and received two cycles of doxorubicin/ifosfamide/mesna (AIM) neoadjuvant chemotherapy. His physical exam on presentation for second opinion demonstrated a large palpable abdominal mass and fullness around the right spermatic cord. There was no appreciable change in tumor size or distant metastases on repeat scanning. Given some obstructive symptoms, a multidisciplinary team advised neoadjuvant radiation followed by radical resection of RLPS. Final pathology demonstrated a 31-cm grade II well-differentiated (WD) liposarcoma with low-grade dedifferentiation. Scattered foci of microscopic positive WD margins were noted, and the remainder of margins were negative. Genomic evaluation showed amplification of CDK4, MDM2, and FRS2. A concise literature review of common presentations, histopathology, genomics, and treatment information is discussed herein. Thorough physical exams, attention to subtle findings, appropriate medical imaging studies, and a high index of suspicion when evaluating vague symptomatology can lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment of RLPS, and ultimately better patient outcomes. 




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