Grand Rounds

Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Advanced Practice Management From Presentation to Cure

Meredith Beaton, RN, MSN, AG-ACNP, Glen J. Peterson, RN, DNP, ACNP, and Kelly O’Brien, RN, MSN, ANP-C, ACNP-BC

From University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado

Authors’ disclosures of conflicts of interest are found at the end of this article.

Correspondence to: Meredith Beaton, RN, MSN, AG-ACNP, 1665 Aurora Court, Aurora, Colorado 80045.


J Adv Pract Oncol 2020;11(8):836–844 | https://doi.org/10.6004/jadpro.2020.11.8.4 | © 2020 Harborside™


  

ABSTRACT

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, diagnosed in approximately 21,450 individuals annually in the US with nearly 11,000 deaths attributable to this disease (National Cancer Institute, 2020). Acute myeloid leukemia is a disease of the elderly, with the average age of diagnosis being 68 years old (Kouchkovsky & Abdul-Hay, 2016). It is a heterogeneous disease with widely varying presentations but universally carries a poor prognosis in the majority of those affected. Unfortunately, the 5-year overall survival rate remains poor, at less than 5% in patients over 65 years of age (Thein, Ershler, Jemal, Yates, & Baer, 2013). The landscape of AML is beginning to change, however, as new and improved treatments are emerging. Advanced practitioners (APs) are often involved in the care of these complex patients from the time of initial symptoms through diagnosis, treatment, and potentially curative therapy. It is vitally important for APs to understand and be aware of the various presentations, initial management strategies, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for patients with AML, especially in the elderly population, which until recently had few treatment options. This Grand Rounds article highlights the common presenting signs and symptoms of patients with AML in the hospital, including a discussion of the upfront clinical stability issues, oncologic emergencies, diagnostic evaluation, and current treatment options for elderly patients and those with poor performance status. 




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