Research & Scholarship

Implementation of Survivorship Care Plans in Patients With Glioblastoma

Casey B. Brown,(1) DNP, RN, AGPCNP-BC, Deborah Allen,(1) PhD, RN, CNS, FNP-BC, AOCNP®, Christina Cone,(1) DNP, APRN, ANP-BC, AOCNP®, and Susan M. Schneider,(2) PhD, RN, AOCN®, ACNS-BC, FAAN

From (1)Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina; (2)Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina

Authors’ disclosures of conflicts of interest are found at the end of this article.

Correspondence to: Casey B. Brown, DNP, RN, AGPCNP-BC, Duke Cancer Institute, 047 Baker House, Trent Drive, Durham, NC 27710 E-mail: casey.brown@duke.edu


J Adv Pract Oncol 2020;11(1):37–48 | https://doi.org/10.6004/jadpro.2020.11.1.2 | © 2020 Harborside™


  

ABSTRACT

Background: The outcomes and survival of patients diagnosed with glioblastoma are improving due to advancements in therapy and better symptom management. Focusing on survivorship is an important initiative for these patients. A quality improvement project performed by an advanced practitioner in adults with glioblastoma evaluated the efficacy and utility of survivorship care plans (SCP). Providing patients and their families with SCPs gives them important information about their cancer, treatment, and follow-up management and care. Methods: Survivors of a glioblastoma who were receiving an oral alkylating agent and/or bevacizumab, as well as those who had completed these therapies within the past year were included. Patients had received surgery and radiation. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Distress Thermometer and a pre- and postintervention survey evaluated knowledge, distress, and rate of follow-up care. Results: Over 2 months, 18 eligible participants received the SCP with a long-term care coaching appointment with an advanced practitioner. Knowledge pertaining to long-term effects of therapy and chemotherapy regimen improved. Ratings of overall distress and patient-reported primary care follow-up remained the same. Conclusion: Providing patients with glioblastoma with an SCP and an educational visit can improve knowledge pertaining to their chemotherapy regimens and long-term effects of therapy. This can result in more effective long-term management and care.




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