Original Research

Fitness and Quality of Life Outcomes of Cancer Survivor Participants in a Community Exercise Program

Rita Musanti, PhD, APN-BC, Ying-Yu Chao, PhD, GNP-BC, and Katelyn Collins, BS, RDN

Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences School of Nursing, The State University of New Jersey School of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey

Authors’ disclosures of conflicts of interest are found at the end of this article.

Rita Musanti, PhD, APN-BC, School of Nursing, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 110 Paterson Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. E-mail: rmusanti@sn.rutgers.edu


J Adv Pract Oncol 2019;10(1):24–37 | https://doi.org/10.6004/jadpro.2019.10.1.2 | © 2019 Harborside™


  

ABSTRACT

Abstract

Exercise is recommended for cancer survivors, as it mitigates treatment side effects and improves overall wellness. Therefore, survivors attend community-based exercise programs and report positive results, but published evaluations of outcomes of these programs are scarce in the literature. The objective of this study is to validate the anecdotal reports of the physical fitness and quality of life benefits of the LIVESTRONG at the YMCA program. A retrospective analysis of deidentified data consisting of 17 program cohorts of the LIVESTRONG at the YMCA program (n = 88) was conducted. Statistically significant improvements were seen when compared to baseline in the physical fitness measures of the 6-minute walk, the chest and leg presses, the sit-and-reach test, and the one-leg stand test, as well as in the domains of the 29-item Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS-29) Profile, a health-related quality of life questionnaire. These domains are physical function, anxiety, depression, fatigue, social role satisfaction, and pain. The anecdotal impression that participation in the LIVESTRONG at the YMCA program improves physical fitness and subjective quality of life perceptions was supported by statistical analysis of the subjective and objective pre- and postprogram measurements for this data set. Exercise in this cancer-specific community exercise program is likely to improve physical fitness and quality of life outcomes.




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