Original Research

Top Information Need Priorities of Older Adults Newly Diagnosed With Active Myeloma

Joseph D. Tariman1, PhD, ANP-BC, Ardith Doorenbos2, PhD, RN, FAAN, Karen G. Schepp2, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, FAAN, Seema Singhal2, MD, and Donna L. Berry2, PhD, RN, FAAN, AOCN®

1School of Nursing/College of Science and Health at De Paul University, Chicago, Illinois; 2University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; 3Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

Authors’ disclosures of potential conflicts of interest are found at the end of this article.

Joseph Tariman, PhD, ANP-BC, 990 W. Fullerton Avenue, Suite 3000C, Chicago, IL 60614.


J Adv Pract Oncol 2015;6:14–21 | DOI: 10.6004/jadpro.2015.6.1.2 | © 2015 Harborside Press®


  

ABSTRACT

Prioritizing patients’ information needs maximizes efficiency. This study examined the information sources and priorities in a sample of older adults newly diagnosed with symptomatic myeloma requiring immediate therapy. An association analysis of whether information needs were influenced by sociodemographic variables such as age, gender, education, marital status, and income was also conducted. The Information Needs Questionnaire (INQ) and an investigator-developed interview schedule were administered to 20 older adults diagnosed with symptomatic myeloma during a 30- to 45-minute semistructured interview. We found that older adults newly diagnosed with symptomatic myeloma have different priorities of information needs when compared with younger patients diagnosed with various types of cancer. The top three priorities related to treatment, prognosis, and self-care. Sociodemographic variables did not influence the priorities of information needs among older adults with symptomatic myeloma. The Internet, physicians, family, and friends were among the top sources of information. Advanced practitioners in oncology should support and identify interventions that can enhance patients’ learning process from these sources. Well poised to assist patients in searching credible and reliable Internet sources, advanced practitioners in oncology can provide patient education about different treatments and the impact of such treatments on prognosis (e.g., overall survival and likelihood of cure).




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