Review Article

Mind-Body Therapies: Evidence and Implications in Advanced Oncology Practice

Kelley D. Mayden, MSN, FNP, AOCNP®

From Southwest Virginia Cancer Center, Norton, Virginia

The author has no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Correspondence to: Kelley D. Mayden, MSN, FNP, AOCNP®, 671 Highway 58 East, Norton, VA 24273. E-mail: kdunrun@charter.net


J Adv Pract Oncol 2012;3:357–373 | DOI: 10.6004/jadpro.2012.3.6.2 | © 2012 Harborside Press®


  

ABSTRACT

The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom control. Traditional training has not been structured to provide advanced practitioners with an in-depth knowledge of the clinical applications of mind-body therapies. The aim of this article is to acquaint the reader with common mind-body modalities (meditation/mindfulness-based stress reduction, relaxation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, support groups, and aromatherapy) and to examine important evidence in support of or against their clinical application.




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